Is Worrying Too Much Sapping your Time and Energy? | THJ

Is Worrying Too Much Sapping your Time and Energy?

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Are you worrying too much? There are many people out there who would tell you that you ought to never worry about anything. However, I do not necessarily agree with this. In my mind, a little bit of worry shows we care about what’s going on. It also makes us less likely to become indifferent to what lies ahead. But worrying could definitely be slowing you down.

Disclosure: If you purchase anything from links in this post or any other, I may receive some kind of affiliate commission. However, I only ever mention products I love and would recommend whether I was being compensated or not.

People may irritate you by telling you to do not worry. But worrying too much generally slows you down and hits your productivity hard. Also, worrying means you suffer twice. Learning how to worry less and to stop negative thoughts is a huge part of self discovery personal development, self mastery and feeling happiness about life

It is likely that worrying too much will sap your time and energy. Worry makes it very difficult to focus on the present. Spending all your time contemplating the “what ifs” of life could well be slowing you down.

What is worry?

Our minds love fact. Our brains work best when the outcomes are based on fact and certainty. In other words, we thrive on knowing what’s around the corner. When we have fact, we can plan and execute. But, as we know, life is not always that straightforward. Uncertainty is around every corner, and with it comes worry.

Our minds are naturally inclined to focus on negatives before the positive outcomes. Even though there may be loads of possible outcomes, people tend to focus on the negative rather than positive. How exhausting!

Say you’re starting a new business. You have everything planned out, but you need to make money to pay the bills. You begin to fear that the money won’t come, which would throw your planning out of sync. Fair enough. But, what you don’t realise is that if worry too much you give to your fears, the more anxious you become. Before you know it, worries have taken over your mind and your ability to focus is compromised.

So, the worry is a result of the unknown and the fear it naturally brings us. Yes, I said naturally. As I said, our brains don’t like the unknown. Think of it in terms of the Flight or Flight instincts we have.

Our fears turn into worry because they are undeveloped fears (what could/might happen). Rather than specific threats (what will happen). Many of us end up neither flighting or fighting, stuck in worrying limbo land!

I know what you’re thinking! How can it be natural if some people worry way more than others? This is because, although our brains hold a lot of power, it is possible to retrain our brains. So, we take back a bit of that power. Boom!

Worrying too much will sap your time and energy!

People may irritate you by telling you to do not worry. But worrying too much generally slows you down and hits your productivity hard. Also, worrying means you suffer twice. Learning how to worry less and to stop negative thoughts is a huge part of self discovery personal development, self mastery and feeling happiness about life

We all worry from time to time; it is something we all experience. But it must not be confused with thinking things through. Thinking leads us towards taking action, whereas worry does not. The only thing worrying leads us towards is exhaustion. Which means we have less energy and need to spend more time recouping. Like I say, worrying too much will sap your time and energy.

When a worry enters your head, it is likely to stick around for quite some time.

Worry is a little like a  pesky mosquito. You can hear it, you can feel it, but you can’t see it or shake it off! And the more you try to listen out for it, to try and find it, the more annoyed you become. In the end, after going round in circles for a while, it has bugged you for so long that you can’t think of anything else.

In his book, Stop Worrying, Ad Kerkhof describes worrying too much as 'a form of self-torture'. He points out that ‘our thoughts often make us suffer a great deal’.

Kerkhof’s book is stocked with methods and tips for retraining your brain to keep the worrying to a minimum. The exercises he suggests are based on a combination of cognitive therapy and mindful techniques, which are well worth a read.

I have a list of my own ideas and exercises for minimising worry in your everyday life. I will post these very soon. For now, though, I want to leave you with something to consider (not worry about!).

Otten people spend hours worrying too much about possible future events that scare them. These events may or may not happen. Already this sounds like a massive amount of mental energy, right?

On top of these scary events that may not happen, people worry that they may not be able to cope if they do occur. But, I promise you this, when life throws rubbish at you, you will be able to cope. You always have, and you always will.

Think about that for a while.

Disclosure: If you purchase anything from links in this post or any other, I may receive some kind of affiliate commission. However, I only ever mention products I love and would recommend whether I was being compensated or not.

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